Things We Say in the Dark – Chilling Short Stories

on

Halloween may be over, but these scary short stories are still perfect for chilly nights.  And Kirsty Logan’s latest collection of short stories is truly terrifying. Things We Say in the Dark will have you reaching for a night light, questioning your home’s every creak and sigh.

These tales are woven together by stories drawn from Logan’s own life. An isolated writing retreat in Iceland. Getting married to her wife, Annie, in a gorgeous public library. And all the hopes and fears that come with trying for a baby. Indeed, the stories are so spooky that Logan’s wife asked to stop hearing them.

Things We Say in the Dark is not comfortable reading. This creepy collection marks a sharp departure from the aura of fairytale romance that characterizes Logan’s earlier writing. Desperate ghosts, a tiny house built from teeth, dying bodies hung up as scarecrows – make no mistake, this book is twisted.

But it is also thrilling. Like all of the best works of horror, Things We Say in the Dark is so compelling that you can’t help but turn another page. And another. And the page after that. A need to find out what happens next will propel readers through terrors that are both unimaginable and instantly recognizable.

Like all of the best works of horror, Things We Say in the Dark is so compelling that you can’t help but turn another page. And another. And the page after that. A need to find out what happens next will propel readers through terrors that are both unimaginable and instantly recognizable.

The stories are divided by three key themes: the House, the Child, and the Past. Delving deep into subjects that are dark and sometimes painful, they are deeply unsettling, These stories resonate because they give voice to concerns that are familiar to countless women, shattering the taboos surrounding miscarriage and fear of motherhood. With searing honesty, Logan explores the hope that comes with new life, balanced against the worry of losing a baby – and losing yourself to motherhood.

As is often the case in Logan’s fictional worlds, lesbian relationships are a recurring theme. Between the bodily horror and psychological twists, there are some poignant observations about lesbian life.

Writing with surgical precision, Logan examines the hurt that comes with realizing a woman has been flirting not because she wants to be with you, but for the entertainment of her boyfriend. Through Colette and Alison, a couple taking turns to get pregnant, she highlights many of the worries attached to building a family as a same-sex couple. A haunted house inherited by a young lesbian couple contains, as well as the vengeful spirit of a kelpie, the memory of homophobia within the family.

Things We Say in the Dark can be a challenging read, because it shines a light on the thoughts and feelings we tuck away in the shadowy corners of our minds. But this is what makes the collection so powerful. These stories will haunt you long after the last page has been turned.

Zergnet Code