Jane Wiedlin talks bisexuality, BDSM and The Go-Go’s last tour

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Jane Wiedlin is a queer rock icon and an open book. The Go-Go’s guitarist and songwriter has been out as bisexual and as a member of the BDSM community for so long that, as she mentions in our interview, people don’t even think to ask her about it anymore. Well for very obvious reasons, it’s still of interest to us and Jane, who just set off on The Go-Go’s Farewell Tour, was nice enough to indulge us during a quick chat between tour stops.

GettyImages-533092264via Getty

AfterEllen.com: How aware were you in the early days and how aware are you now of your queer female fans?

Jane Wiedlin: It would be impossible not to be aware of our fan base. We’ve always had queer women fans, queer male fans. I think back in the ‘80s we had more lesbians and less gay men, and nowadays we have more gay men and less lesbians.

 

AE: Any reason why you think that is?

JW: I don’t know. Obviously, we’re very gay-friendly with women or men–we don’t mind. We love everybody. You know, The Go-Go’s show is really like a big party and people that really like to have fun and dance and go crazy, those are the kind of people that gravitate towards our shows.

 

AE: Not that we can always pick out a lesbian or bisexual woman. Maybe there are more out there in the crowd than either of us knows about.

JW: That could be.

Jane 1988 Photo Credit- Sam Caliphoto by Sam Cali

AE: You personally, you’re a well-known public person who’s out about being bisexual and have been for some time now. That said, we’re living in a world, as you’re probably aware, where bisexual erasure is still prevalent, particularly in the media. Have you experienced that? What are your thoughts on that in general?

JW: I never really spend a lot of time thinking about it. To me, it was just that I was always a free spirit, and it was just like whoever I loved was who I loved, and it wasn’t necessarily because they were a man or a woman. I didn’t feel this real strong boundary that it seems like most people seem to feel. I feel like I’ve always been really open about it for a really long time, and just nobody’s ever shown any interest in it. And I’m not going to go around like saying, “Hey! Guess what? I’m bisexual. Woo-hoo! Pay attention to me.” Like I just don’t really see it as an issue. So I don’t really feel erased or not erased. But I mean, yeah, I think that a lot of people kind of have a problem with bisexuality because everyone wants everyone to like choose and to stay in some kind of box. But not everybody works that way.

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