An interview with Julianne Moore

Julianne Moore has become quite the lesbian icon. She’s played queer in The Hours and The Private Lives of Pippa Lee and played the wife of a closeted gay man in Far from Heaven. And this year, she hooked up with Amanda Seyfried in Chloe and is now co-starring with Annette Bening as lesbian parents in out writer-director Lisa Cholodenko’s The Kids Are All Right.

AfterEllen.com caught up with Moore as she met the press for the upcoming release to talk about families of all kinds, how Bening compares to the rest of her on-screen love interests and how Kids is a political film in how it isn’t political at all.

AfterEllen.com: This year, you’ve had Chloe with Amanda Seyfried and now Kids. What is it about roles like these that attract you to them?
Julianne Moore:
It’s interesting — both of those roles are about middle age, which is exactly where I am. I think it’s no mistake that I’m attracted to this stuff. [Both films] are also about long-term relationships. Both of these women sort of go, “Wait a minute, where am I? I’ve lived X number of years with this person.”

In Chloe, she feels like her husband is having an affair and she’s disappearing and she has all these issues and she spins this whole story. And in this, you see these people who have been together for 20 years and there’s suddenly this tension because one of them doesn’t know who she is anymore. It’s interesting that they’re similar thematically. That exploration of relationships and time I think is really interesting.

Amanda Seyfried and Moore in Chloe

AE: You were attached to this project for a long time. What was it about working with Lisa that had that grip on you?

JM:
I loved her movies so much. I love Laurel Canyon and High Art — I actually approached her at a Women in Film luncheon and asked her why I hadn’t seen the script for High Art. [Laughs] And she was like, “I think you were working.” I’m like, “I don’t think I was! I never even saw it!” I said I would really love to work with her and we expressed our admiration for each other and she sent me this.

Lisa Cholodenko

Her movies are so much about relationships. There’s never an event in her films; it’s really about how people connect and how they communicate and what they’re trying to illicit from each other and how they love each other. It’s the kind of film I respond to the most because it’s about human behavior.

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