Interview With Kristanna Loken

 
 

AE: Were you pleased with the story arc your character followed?
KL:
I honestly didn’t really think too much about it. I was initially going
to come on and do a few episodes, and then it ended up being a full season.
Then Ilene called me and said this is a great story line, and I was really busy
doing Painkiller Jane, so I really
physically could not have done any more episodes than I did.

I guess it was true to
[Shane's] character. That’s what I’m gathering. I haven’t really watched a lot
of the earlier episodes before I was on the show, but I don’t know, I guess in
the end [Shane's] character wasn’t shown in a very good light, but I guess that’s
kind of how her character is.

AE: So you’re not taking responsibility for the arson?
KL:
[laughs] No, that was kind of something they put in there. I somehow
don’t really see Paige really caring that much to go and start a fire at [Shane's]
place of work. I don’t necessarily think that’s her character. If she did do
it, Paige has a really low, nasty streak in her.

AE: It sounded like, from some interviews you’ve given, that there was
tension on the set.
KL:
Yeah, you know, it’s a set of all women, and women can be catty. There
were a lot of people that were great. I really loved Ilene Chaiken. I think she’s
wonderful, and Angela Robinson was great, and we had some wonderful directors
to work with. … I loved that a lot of the crew was women and it was a
female-driven show, which is totally unlike how it normally is on a set, where
it’s probably 80 percent male. So that was fun.

But the girls — some of
them weren’t really the most welcoming. I think coming into a cast that’s
super-tight after they’ve worked together for a number of years is hard. You
want to feel accepted, and you want to feel like people want you to be there.
And when people aren’t really the most welcoming, it just makes it tough. Like
in any workplace, if anybody starts a new job and they’re working with people
who aren’t the most welcoming or friendly, you don’t really feel like you’re
having that much fun.

Again, I loved what the
show was about, and some of the people were great. But, you know … sometimes people are more welcoming with others, and that could
just be the way these people are, and so be it.

AE: Was it any different when you came back to film your last episode?
KL:
You know, I have to say people were really cool when I came back for
the last show I did. People were really cool, and I think that they maybe had
realized that they hadn’t been the most welcoming or whatever. And I’m not
saying everybody’s got to be my best friend — I don’t care about that — but at
least you want to feel welcomed and accepted and like you’re part of something
really cool. Because that’s what I thought it was: I thought it was a really
cool show, and I was happy to be there. So in the end, everybody was fine, and
that’s the truth.

AE: Did you enjoy working with Kate [Moennig] in particular?
KL:
Yeah, I think she’s a good actress and she makes interesting choices in
her work. She’s definitely the character. I think a lot of those character-people
lines after several years become a little skewed as to who’s necessarily what
or who.

AE: I think it’d be really difficult as an actor to avoid having that
happen.
KL:
Depending on the character, right. I think if the character is someone
who’s really close to who you are as a person, then, yeah, it would be very
easy for those lines to get crossed.

AE: Last question: I know you love the outdoors. Do you have any major
adventures planned?
KL:
Well, I like doing little explorations. I think you can have so much
fun in your own city if you just take the time to explore what’s around you. We
went on a 13-mile hike near L.A. the other day, where it was 80 degrees at the
base and we climbed about 5,000 feet, and there was snow on top, which was
super cool. And then we looked over at the next hill and were like, "What’s
that over there?" So I think we know where we’re going next.

Lime Salted Love screens at
the ImaginAsian Theater in New York City on March 1 at 8 p.m. Tickets are
available at www.nyfilmvideo.com.
Loken will be on hand to introduce the film and plans to attend the after-party
at Pacha.

Watch the trailer for Lime Salted Love:

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