Glee Episode 2.03 Recap: It’s “Kurt’s Turn” Tonight

 
 

Meanwhile, back at Finn’s hormones, he agrees to set aside
his new-found devotion to the big JC and raise his and Rachel’s future children
as Jews, apparently because he thinks it will get her to let him touch her
boobs — which it does, praise Cheesus. Also? Creepiest make-out scene ever.
The lack of chemistry between these two is reaching matter/anti-matter levels.

Fortunately, we’re now in dyke heaven, a Sue, Santana and Brittany scene. Sue
wants to know what’s going on in Glee Club with the religion thing, and Santana
says that it’s not that big a deal, and they just want to help Kurt.

"I made him a card that said heart attacks are just
from loving too much," Brittany
says.

Next, Sue tackles Kurt directly, asking how his dad is.
"I’m sorry for what you’re going through, lady," she says. "I
wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. And I don’t have to, because I guess Mary
Lou Retton is an orphan or something."

Then she goes on. "I don’t like what Schuester’s doing
in that classroom even more than usual. And I can’t go to the school board
without an official complaint from a student."

"So you want me to be your scapegoat?" Kurt says.
(Not to nitpick, but that’s not what a scapegoat is.)

"You don’t understand," Sue says. "I know at
times I mess around with you guys for fun. I admit it. It aids digestion. But
I’m not joking here. I want to be your champion."

We’re still in Sue’s office in the next scene. She’s on the
phone, and Emma comes storming in, red hair flying behind her. "What is
wrong with you?" she almost shouts at Sue.

"I’m sorry, Madame Secretary," Sue says into the
phone. "I’m going to have to call you back. Love to Bill." Then she
hangs up.

Emma’s furious, demanding to know why Sue is so upset at
people trying to give Kurt "just a little bit of comfort."

"What happened to you, Sue?" she demands.
"What horrible thing happened that made you such a miserable, miserable
tyrant?"

"Have a seat," says Sue, and then, to my surprise
and I’d guess everyone else’s, too, she tells Emma the truth. How she had
prayed, and then prayed harder, for her older sister to be cured of her Down
Syndrome, and for everyone to stop mocking her. And when her prayers weren’t
answered, she realized it wasn’t because she wasn’t praying hard enough, but
because no one was listening. "Asking someone to believe in a fantasy,
however ‘comforting,’ isn’t a moral thing to do. It’s cruel."

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