A Quickie With Erin Kelly

 
 

AE: How has starring
in Loving Annabelle affected your life
and career?
EK:
Well, first of all, it’s an honor to have such a loyal lesbian fan
base. Women are strength … they have much more power than society sometimes
tells us they do. Women kick ass. What could be better than kick-ass fans?

AE: Kick-ass fans who
will wash your car.
EK:
[laughs] Actually, I was surprised that the fan mail for Loving Annabelle went in the direction
that it did. I do get a lot of very flattering emails, but I’ve also received
letters from older women saying: "Because of your movie, I’ve finally been
able to come out of the closet, tell my family that I’m gay, tell my friends,
and be proud of the fact that I’m gay. Thank you for that."

And then there’s the other side — young girls writing me
asking, "How do I tell my family I’m gay?" and "How do I tell my
friends that I’m gay?" or "How do I know if I’m gay?" And that
portion has been overwhelming because I don’t know the answers to those
questions. I know what it’s like to be a teenager and to struggle there, so I
can offer that, but as far as answering those questions … I haven’t worked out
the best way to respond to those fans yet. Maybe an "Ask Annabelle"
site or an internet video series? I’m still thinking about that.

AE: I smell a vlog. The
other day, you told me you don’t own a television.
EK:
No, I don’t.

AE: What do you do
for fun while everyone else is watching Project
Runway
?
EK:
I live on the water. I like to surf. I also hike and do yoga. I just
partnered with a company called LOL, which is where I’ve been spending a lot of
my time. We go to inner city schools, schools across the board and all around
the world, and teach improv and acting to kids.

AE: You do improv?
EK:
I do. I studied at Upright Citizen’s Brigade … took my first class two
years ago.

AE: I didn’t know you
did comedy.
EK:
Well, I don’t, so improv is definitely a good exercise for me.

AE: You don’t think
you’re funny?
EK:
I don’t feel other people find me amusing. But I amuse myself.

AE: That’s all that
matters.
EK:
And I amuse Katherine.

Kelly with Katherine
Brooks

AE: Even better. You’re also a member of
the Ruskin Group Theater Company in Santa Monica. They do "Café Plays"
which, from what I can gather, is something akin to speed theater. What is it?
EK:
Yeah, I’m one of the creators of that; it’s an ongoing project that
happens the first Sunday of every month, and it’s a great exercise for writers,
directors and actors.

At 9 o’clock in the morning, writers meet at the café and are
given two headshots at random. Then, they have four and a half hours to write
something that takes place in the café. At 1:30 p.m., it goes to the theater
and those two actors are there with a director — Katherine’s directed this
before — and they have five and a half hours to get the play up on its feet. The
shows go on at 7:30 and 9:00 that night.

AE: Life doesn’t have
enough pressure? You have to go out and do this?
EK:
[laughs] That’s the industry we’re in.

AE: Have you ever
forgotten your lines because you had a nanosecond to rehearse?
EK:
Well, yes. The only time I’ve ever forgotten my lines onstage was
during a Café Play. It was with Jake Newton, who played Cat’s brother in Loving Annabelle. He and I looked at
each other — it wasn’t for very long — but it felt like an eternity.

AE: What character
would you like to tackle, but hasn’t come your way yet?
EK:
I would love, love, love to do comedy. It would be so much fun. But I
like the dark, f—ed-up roles.

AE: Like Grace, the drug
and sex addict.
EK:
Yes. Another role that comes to mind is Cate Blanchett in Notes on a Scandal.

AE: Another teacher-student
thing. I’m seeing a theme with you, Erin.
EK:
[laughs] Hmm.

 

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